It’s Happening: Zero Server Architecture is Now

It’s Happening: Zero Server Architecture is Now

zero server architecture

As far back as 2012 it was predicted that there would be big implications for the creation and distribution of software and applications in a serverless world. But transition over the following few years has been slow. In the previous few years, the world still seemed to revolve around around servers. And although colocation facilities have been handling many parts of the server environment, dealing with the security, power, internet, cooling, and capital expense has still required a great deal of time and detailed planning.

In just the past year, there has been a massive shift as developers have begun to leverage a limitless supply of virtual machines to fire up servers and load applications in just minutes. Gone are the days of deploying more server, network, and storage infrastructure than you actually need in case you need to scale up.

So why the sudden surge?

Microsoft has begun to report staggering numbers around Azure adoption spanning the spectrum from startups, to enterprises, to the public sector.

Although Microsoft has been late to the cloud battle against Amazon Web Services (AWS), with recent developments around Elon Musk expressing appreciation to Microsoft for use of Azure cloud, and Wal-Mart asking vendors to get off Amazon’s Cloud it seems that Microsoft is firmly within, and gaining speed in the zero server architecture game.

Sure, some might suggest that the wave of cloud transformation is happening regardless of Microsoft’s influence and force, but when you add up the numbers the high-powered users, and thrown in a Xbox and HoloLens leading the way for digital natives, there’s one thing for sure – Microsoft is definitely cool again.

Lesly Kenney holds an MBA from the University of Redlands. She is a Qualified Microsoft Experience Center (MEC) Facilitator as well as a Certified Online Instructor in the Colorado Community College system. Lesly is an Enterprise Social evangelist and she thrives on finding the creative hook that fosters a culture of innovation, productivity, and collaboration through the use of technology.